Drake – Look What You've Done (31,331 plays)

easyluckyyfree:

Look What You’ve Done - Drake

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carminagf:

Alice. 1877. Henry Tanworth Wells

carminagf:

Alice. 1877. Henry Tanworth Wells

(via martyred)

"How strange it is. We have these deep terrible lingering fears about ourselves and the people we love. Yet we walk around, talk to people, eat and drink. We manage to function. The feelings are deep and real. Shouldn’t they paralyze us? How is it we can survive them, at least for a little while? We drive a car, we teach a class. How is it no one sees how deeply afraid we were, last night, this morning? Is it something we all hide from each other, by mutual consent? Or do we share the same secret without knowing it? Wear the same disguise?"

Don DeLillo, White Noise  (via wiltedbones)

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diamondpop:

image

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popculturediedin2009:

Kim out shopping in Los Angeles, July 2008

popculturediedin2009:

Kim out shopping in Los Angeles, July 2008

(via cuntroversy)

katsv:

Victorian fairy painting

'Fairy painting, particularly when produced in its Golden Age, between 1840 and 1870, is a peculiarly British contribution to the development of Romanticism. […] As modern industrial progress engulfed the English countryside, the Victorians embraced belief in fairies as a reaction to the disenchantment of the world […] Fairy painting is the visual evidence of a spectrum of mid-19th-century preoccupations: nationalism, antiquarianism, exploration, anthropology, the dismantling of religious belief and, crucially, the emergence of spiritualism.’ Jeremy Maas and others, Victorian Fairy Paintingexhib. catalogue (Royal Academy of Arts: Merrell Holberton, London, 1998)

John Anster Fitzgerald (1823-1906), The Fairy’s Barque, 1860
John Anster Fitzgerald, Fairy Hordes Attacking a Bat, date unknown
Richard Dadd (1817-1886), Titania Sleeping, 1841
Joseph Noel Paton (1821-1901), The Reconciliation of Oberon and Titania, 1847
Edwin Landseer (1802-1873), Scene from ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’, Titania and Bottom, 1848-51
Richard Doyle (1824-1883), ‘The Triumphal March of the Elf King’, from In Fairyland, or Pictures from the Elf World, 1869

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"Terrence Malick’s new film is a form of prayer. It created within me a spiritual awareness, and made me more alert to the awe of existence. It functions to pull us back from the distractions of the moment, and focus us on mystery and gratitude."

-Roger Ebert

(Source: terrymalicks, via terrymalicks)

oldflorida:

Class assembled in front of a thatched one-room school building, 1890s, State Archives of Florida

oldflorida:

Class assembled in front of a thatched one-room school building, 1890s, State Archives of Florida

(Source: literallysame, via christophwaltz)