nevver:

Judgmental maps

nevver:

Judgmental maps

"She hated the namelessness of women in stories, as if they lived and died so that men could have metaphysical insights."

Chad Harbach, The Art of Fielding  (via glittergheist)

(Source: fissionaccomplished, via e-pic)

wonderful-strange:

Where Have You Been?, Good Housekeeping magazine story illustration, May 1948. Art by Garth Wiliams.

wonderful-strange:

Where Have You Been?, Good Housekeeping magazine story illustration, May 1948. Art by Garth Wiliams.

(Source: ha.com, via collectingbookillustrations)

(Source: aminorwreck, via paulthomasandersonn)

Storyboards from Pocahontas by Glen Keane

(Source: disneyconceptsandstuff)

lastnightsreading:

Leslie Jamison at McNally-Jackson, 4/16/14

lastnightsreading:

Leslie Jamison at McNally-Jackson, 4/16/14

(via joyfulwanderer)

(Source: wmagazine, via aquamans)

brightwalldarkroom:

“The Andersons know violence and vengeance and they know love and compassion, and they know how to render these strange, often scary states of being honestly and gorgeously in ways that consistently surprise and confound. Think about how a viewer, after watching Rushmore and Magnolia back-to-back, would likely be hard-pressed to say with any real confidence whether Max Fischer loves his teacher Rosemary Cross any more than Quiz Kid Donnie Smith loves Brad, the bartender with the braces on his teeth. These mad and needy and bonkers-in-love relationships, among countless others that appear throughout each Anderson’s oeuvre, are never weighed or measured—rather, they’re rendered patiently and honestly, with compassion and complete openness in equal measure.  
We connect deeply to the Andersons’ films because each envelops us in a world that has been built for us from the ground up—and as each film starts to make sense to us, it becomes a sort of touchstone that aligns aesthetic and emotion. The world of Boogie Nights looks and sounds like this; watching Fantastic Mr. Fox makes me feel like that. Together, their films begin to offer us comfort and structure and familiarity (doesn’t watching the opening sequence of The Royal Tenenbaums feel rather a lot like listening to a favorite bedtime story?). The deeper reason, however, that we respond to these films in the ways we do, is that they let us see a hidden sliver of ourselves and of those around us. They let us flirt with danger, speed-date the scarier parts of our personalities, and then emerge with a larger, fuller understanding of the real ranges of our emotional lives. They let us try on the skins of people who are murderous or meek or desperately in love (or just desperate) and see how we feel about it. See what fits us best.”
—Alexandra Tanner, "I Just Wanna Feel Everything" (Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine, April 2014)
 

brightwalldarkroom:

The Andersons know violence and vengeance and they know love and compassion, and they know how to render these strange, often scary states of being honestly and gorgeously in ways that consistently surprise and confound. Think about how a viewer, after watching Rushmore and Magnolia back-to-back, would likely be hard-pressed to say with any real confidence whether Max Fischer loves his teacher Rosemary Cross any more than Quiz Kid Donnie Smith loves Brad, the bartender with the braces on his teeth. These mad and needy and bonkers-in-love relationships, among countless others that appear throughout each Anderson’s oeuvre, are never weighed or measured—rather, they’re rendered patiently and honestly, with compassion and complete openness in equal measure.  

We connect deeply to the Andersons’ films because each envelops us in a world that has been built for us from the ground up—and as each film starts to make sense to us, it becomes a sort of touchstone that aligns aesthetic and emotion. The world of Boogie Nights looks and sounds like this; watching Fantastic Mr. Fox makes me feel like that. Together, their films begin to offer us comfort and structure and familiarity (doesn’t watching the opening sequence of The Royal Tenenbaums feel rather a lot like listening to a favorite bedtime story?). The deeper reason, however, that we respond to these films in the ways we do, is that they let us see a hidden sliver of ourselves and of those around us. They let us flirt with danger, speed-date the scarier parts of our personalities, and then emerge with a larger, fuller understanding of the real ranges of our emotional lives. They let us try on the skins of people who are murderous or meek or desperately in love (or just desperate) and see how we feel about it. See what fits us best.”

—Alexandra Tanner, "I Just Wanna Feel Everything" (Bright Wall/Dark Room magazine, April 2014)

 

(Source: raymukada, via maisiewilliams)

brightwalldarkroom:

Ladies and Gentlemen: ISSUE #11 IS HERE! 
(Go, read, subscribe!)
—-
Bright Wall/Dark Room, April 2014: The Magnificent Andersons
Letter from the Editor (free)
No, Man, It’s Not Evil. It’s An Illusion.Elizabeth Cantwell on Boogie Nights
A Film in a Minor KeyAndrew Root on Magnolia
Like I’d Never Seen BeforeMichael Arbeiter on Punch-Drunk Love
I Just Wanna Feel EverythingAlexandra Tanner on Violence, Love, and Emotion in the Films of Wes and Paul Thomas Anderson
Growing Up with Bottle RocketDaniel Reynolds on Bottle Rocket
Les Enfants TerriblesKarina Wolf on The Royal Tenenbaums
I’m Trying to Tell You the Truth About MyselfBebe Ballroom on Fantastic Mr. Fox
Wes Anderson is Looney TunesMichelle Said on The Grand Budapest Hotel
Is This the (Hyper) Real Life?a comic by Marieke Pras

For best results, read my essay in this beautiful issue while listening to all the really devastating Fiona Apple songs (read: all Fiona Apple songs) in the background. 

brightwalldarkroom:

Ladies and Gentlemen: ISSUE #11 IS HERE! 

(Go, read, subscribe!)

—-

Bright Wall/Dark Room, April 2014: The Magnificent Andersons


Letter from the Editor
 (free)

No, Man, It’s Not Evil. It’s An Illusion.
Elizabeth Cantwell on Boogie Nights

A Film in a Minor Key
Andrew Root on Magnolia

Like I’d Never Seen Before
Michael Arbeiter on Punch-Drunk Love

I Just Wanna Feel Everything
Alexandra Tanner on Violence, Love, and Emotion in the Films of Wes and Paul Thomas Anderson

Growing Up with Bottle Rocket
Daniel Reynolds on Bottle Rocket

Les Enfants Terribles
Karina Wolf on The Royal Tenenbaums

I’m Trying to Tell You the Truth About Myself
Bebe Ballroom on Fantastic Mr. Fox

Wes Anderson is Looney Tunes
Michelle Said on The Grand Budapest Hotel

Is This the (Hyper) Real Life?
a comic by Marieke Pras

For best results, read my essay in this beautiful issue while listening to all the really devastating Fiona Apple songs (read: all Fiona Apple songs) in the background. 

Default state of being. 

Default state of being. 

tooearlytoolate:

Some SnackWell’s realness in EYES WIDE SHUT

tooearlytoolate:

Some SnackWell’s realness in EYES WIDE SHUT

(via jonny-greenwood)

(Source: flawlessirishprince, via slightlypretentious)